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Survey: 60% of young Christians think Buddha, Muhammad also way to salvation

by Premier Journalist

A new survey seems to implicate that most American Christians are not convinced that Jesus is the only way to Heaven.

Probe Ministries, which offers conservative-leaning worldview and Gospel educational resources, released its Religious Views & Practices Survey last week exploring the specific beliefs of Americans. The study, which interviewed 3,100 Americans between 18 and 55 in 2020, inquired into respondent beliefs regarding crucial Christian doctrines, from Jesus' specific nature to God's nature.

The study found a significant drop in what the study categorizes as "Basic Biblical Worldview" concepts, from God's attributes to the nature of Jesus. While 47 percent of self-identifying Christian respondents had a basic Biblical worldview in 2010, only 25 percent of Christian respondents could say the same in 2020. When it came to "expanded biblical worldview" concepts, like Satan or objective truth, the number dropped from 32 percent to 16 percent. This lead Probe to conclude that even Born-again Christians "can have a false view of Jesus Christ and embrace a pluralistic worldview," Kerby Anderson, president of Probe Ministries, writes. "Pastors and church leaders just can't assume any longer that the members of their church or Christian organization have a biblical worldview."

To illustrate this, Probe asked their respondents if they agreed that "Muhammad, Buddha, and Jesus all taught valid ways to God." Only 35 percent of Born-Again Christian respondents disagreed strongly with that notion. This led Probe to conclude that "over 60 percent of Born Again Christians are ignorant about the basic teachings of their faith." 

When contrasted with the general public, the numbers are even starker. In 2010, 13 percent of the general public adhered to a basic Biblical worldview. That number dropped by half in 2020, down to 6 percent. A similar change is noted when one incorporates an expanded biblical worldview. While nine percent of respondents affirmed an expanded worldview in 2010, only three percent affirmed those ideas in 2020.

When asked for the cause, Kerby claims that this change is due to fewer pastors teaching the Bible and media. "These disturbing trends are, yes, due to pastors not consistently teaching biblical theory. But they can also be attributed to young Christians who are not paying attention, who are focused — nearly exclusively, it seems — on their phones, social media, and other content they deem more compelling." Anderson goes on to argue that ministers "have to continue to explain the cost of salvation ... that there is no way to salvation, other than through the sacrificial and atoning death of a sinless Christ. That no one can come to the Father except through the Son, but also that anyone may come through Him."

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